Category: Publications

Better Active than Radioactive! Anti-Nuclear Protest in 1970s France and West Germany

Published with Oxford University Press. During the 1970s, hundreds of thousands of people across Western Europe protested against civil nuclear energy. Nowhere were they more visible than in France and Germany-two countries where environmentalism seems to have diverged greatly since. This volume recovers the shared, transnational history of the early anti-nuclear movement, showing how low-level…
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Generating Post-Modernity: Nuclear Energy Opponents and the Future in the 1970s

Forthcoming in European Review of History / Revue européenne d’histoire 28 (4), 2021. Abstract: During the 1970s, industrialised society seemed to be on the cusp of sweeping change, moving away from the Fordist ‘modern’ era and into an undefined ‘post-modern’ future. To contemporaries in France and West Germany, arguably nothing symbolized this uncertainty more clearly…
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Towards a ‘Europe of Struggles’? Three Visions of Europe in the Early Anti-Nuclear Energy Movement, 1975–79

in Christian Wenkel, Eric Bussière, Anahita Grisoni and Hélène Miard-Delacroix, eds., The Environment and the European Public Sphere: Perceptions, Actors, Policies (Cambridge: White Horse Press, 2020), 124–146. See a review of this book here. Abstract: During the 1970s, opposition to nuclear energy was structured primarily by local siting decisions related to national nuclear policies. However,…
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Alle Wege führen nach Gorleben

“Alle Wege führen nach Gorleben: Transnationale Netzwerke der Anti-AKW-Bewegung der 1970er Jahre” in: Detlef Schmiechen-Ackermann u.a. (Hg.), Der Gorleben-Treck 1979. Anti-Atom-Protest als soziale Bewegung und demokratischer Lernprozess (= Schriften zur Didaktik der Demokratie, Bd. 5), Göttingen 2020, S. 150–172. Fazit: Für eine dezentrale, lokal verankerte Bewegung wie die Anti-Atomkraft-Bewegung der 1970er Jahre waren transnationale Netzwerke…
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Review: Augustine, Taking on Technocracy

Reviewed for German Studies Review 44 (1), 2021 (pp. 208-210). Summary: Taking on Technocracy covers a broad range of developments in the domains of technology, policy, and protest, analyzing them with nuance in the different contexts of East and West Germany. For those wanting to understand why the issue of nuclear power has remained such…
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Review: Eckert, West Germany and the Iron Curtain

Reviewed for German History (2021, forthcoming). Summary: West Germany and the Iron Curtain is an ambitious re-examination of German history from its literal margins. Eckert’s methodologically innovative analysis not only straddles the East-West divide but interrogates 1945 and 1989/90 as chronological caesuras. Refracted through the environmental history of these borderlands, Germany’s political, social, and cultural…
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Review: Milder, Greening Democracy

Reviewed for H-German (August 2020). Summary: Throughout Greening Democracy, Milder stresses that antinuclear activism was about more than the Greens and that it did more than just bring ’68ers into the fold of liberal, parliamentary democracy. These are welcome arguments, and Milder misses no opportunity to show how people of different generations and with no…
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Binding the Nation, Bounding the State: Germany and its Borders

Review article for German History Vol. 37, No. 1 (2019), examining seventeen recent publications on the borders of Germany and of Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Grassroots Transnationalism(s). Franco-German Opposition to Nuclear Energy in the 1970s

Published in Contemporary European History, vol 25, no. 1 (February 2016), 117-142. Abstract: During the 1970s opposition to nuclear energy was present in countries around the world and thus eminently ‘transnational’. But what did it mean to participate at the grassroots of such a transnational movement and (how) did cross-border connections change protest? This article…
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Review: Smith, Terror and Terroir

Reviewed in French History. Summary: In the summer of 1907, France’s Midi rouge (the ‘red South’) was in revolt, with regular Sunday protests in towns throughout the region drawing as many as 600,000 participants. After protesters torched buildings in Narbonne, the military occupied the town, leading to the deaths of six people and the mutiny…
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